Recap: Software Decisions Good and Bad

It was clear from the onset that attendees were eagerly awaiting this panel, and that Mr. Efkeman, Mr. Lisi and Mr. Stout were the right attorneys to answer the questions before them.

There was great dialogue between the panelists and the audience, as many attendees were either currently in the software platform analysis process or considering purchases for their in-house dpartments.

Session II: De-dupe, Near Dupe and Being Duped: Software Decisions Good and Bad

Panelists: Senior attorneys from FedEx Express, Fidelity Investments
Richard Stout, Director, Litigation Support Division, Counsel On Call

Moderator: Dennis McKinnie, Executive Director, Atlanta, Counsel On Call

Summary of Dialogue
Themes: Review less data, and do it faster; Establish a good relationship between your legal and IT departments and ensure both are speaking the same language; Purchasing software is costly, and those decisions should be carefully considered, especially in an environment in which there is much consolidation currently -- but a purchase can save time and money in the long run; “Try before you buy.”

The panelists agreed that limiting the amount of data to review was paramount to containing costs. They spoke about the importance of Early Case Assessment (ECA) tools, specifically mentioning Clearwell and Trident (by Wave, a de-dupe/culling tool).

As ways to reduce discovery time and costs, Richard Stout (Counsel On Call) echoed the dialogue about reducing the volume of data to review and discussed how to review the data faster. Implementing the right technology and correctly managing the process are central; the volume of data to be reviewed can be reduced by implementing a Comprehensive Records Management Program (including an effective document retention policy), targeting the collection (searching key custodians, date ranges, specific terms), culling and de-duping data, and using ECA tools. Mr. Stout also mentioned companies with project managers available 24/7 as an important factor in selecting software.
 


The question of whether to purchase software was also discussed. While it was clear that every department’s needs and restrictions are different, the general consensus was there are some purchasing decisions that make sense. Clearwell was a very popular option among attendees. Mr. Stout stated that there is a lot of consolidation in the software business at this point in time – it is the fastest growing segment of the legal industry – so some might opt for a “wait and see” approach with many of these decisions. The technology is improving on almost a weekly basis, it seems, and new tools enter the market every month. The key, the panel and audience agreed, is having people who know how to use the software to its fullest capabilities; Mr. Stout stated that attorneys who know all the “bells and whistles” of a particular platform can ultimately save a client hundreds of thousands of dollars in efficiencies during a review (they review more documents per hour).

Some of the biggest mistakes cited by the group included not testing enough software and committing too early and not investigating (and therefore not implementing) the entire software structure selected.

One panelist mentioned that most, if not all, of the software companies will allow you to test their products for 30-90 days so you can see how it will work with your data. He said this ultimately became a big part of his “success” in software selection, or at least in purchasing a tool that is working well for his company.

The group also asked if anyone knew of a “good, end-to-end solution” currently on the market. While there are multiple tools that handle specific parts of the EDRM Model, there seems to be a need for a comprehensive tool. There was some discussion about particular platforms that are rumored to be coming out with more robust tools, but no one would site a particular tool they felt comfortable saying was good for all stages.