Pilot Program to 'Play Nice' in E-Discovery

As we all know by now, in 2006 the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure were amended to standardize how litigants should deal with their electronically stored information (ESI). Soon thereafter, courts at both the Federal and State levels started putting out their own rules (See Tom Allman's Article and a listing of links to state e-discovery rules.)

In addition to the rules themselves, the various courts are trying to find implementation language and protocols that govern the specifics of what the opposing sides must actually do. One example is the 2007 Administrative Order 174 in the Middle District of Tennessee, which spells out what the judges want to see happen at the meet and confer and during the whole discovery process.

Then in 2008, The Sedona Conference published its Cooperation Proclamation in an attempt to codify the steps that opposing counsel should take on the intricate and expensive matters related to identifying, preserving, collecting, searching, reviewing and producing ESI.

Now the 7th Circuit has taken the next step and announced a Pilot Program to last from October 1, 2009 to May 1, 2010, whereby selected cases will have to follow specific principles of cooperation.

The stated purpose is to assist the courts to, among other things, “promote…the early resolution of disputes regarding the discovery of electronically stored information (“ESI”) without Court intervention.” Basically, the Courts are tired of dealing with the lawyers who don’t play nice on matters of e-discovery.

The proposed standing order contains the following (paraphrased) duties: (1) Attorneys not cooperating will be sanctioned; (2) ESI requests should be proportional to the case; (3) Duty to meet and confer, including discussions on identifying ESI and format of production; (4) Identification of an e-discovery liaison to handle disputes; (5) Creation of appropriate and specific preservation requests; and, interestingly, (6) a friendly reminder that the attorneys should become familiar with ESI prior to filing an appearance in one their courtrooms.

First came ESI and the high cost of e-discovery; then came the rules; now comes cooperation and specific actions to follow … all in an attempt to lower costs, deal with the huge influx of discovery disputes and have lawyers play nice.