Susskind: Why Law Firms Have To Change

Richard Susskind has been one of the more outspoken voices on the economies of the legal profession in recent years, authoring two books on the subject. Today, he has a post on the ABA’s Legal Rebels site that’s an interesting read.

He hits several nails directly on their respective heads, as he has similarly in the past, reiterating that “new methods, systems, and processes will emerge to reduce the cost of undertaking routine legal work” and “new ways of sourcing will emerge … and these will often be combined in the conduct of individual pieces of legal work.”

I don’t disagree with anything that he writes -- and we’ve written about these issues for some time -- but I do think his timeline for these changes to occur is on the ambitious side. Lawyers are typically slow adopters; I’m not sure the types of collaborative communities he outlines have enough time to form and truly share new and best practices that have been vetted and tested, especially on complex matters… even though there’s more communication than ever before among in-house colleagues on well-established communities like Legal OnRamp (and other various organic online connectors of in-house counsel). But his point is that the time is now, not down the road, to understand and address these issues.

Regardless, there’s little doubt the legal world is no longer considered flat and the new frontier is upon us. We know that there are some great ways everyone can work together to contain costs and generate the best possible results. Susskind’s post is a good read if you have a few spare moments today.
 

Holding (E-Discovery) Hands In Public

News of the O’Melveny-H5 partnership was heralded by some -- and likely lost among a list of news blurbs for many in the industry. For those who missed it, the partnership means that one of the globe’s leading law firms has partnered with a legal information retrieval (or “search”) company to offer a uniform litigation support service to clients.

The benefits of this partnership have been outlined by industry bloggers Chris Dale and Ron Friedmann, among others. But moving beyond the deal’s strategy-and-search foundations of service, the partnership is good news for all companies providing litigation support/review services and supplies another indication that law firms are moving towards a different business model. Coming out with a news release is particularly noteworthy, as partnerships like this one have previously been seen as damaging to a law firm’s reputation. Not anymore.

What we consistently discuss with our in-house clients is how to take advantage of the resources they have. In litigation, they have outside counsel to handle and shape the strategy. That’s what law firms do best and why their partners’ hourly rates are often justified (and many of our clients agree with this). That expertise is invaluable and the strategic decisions they recommend can save millions of dollars immediately and on future matters. That is a resource.

Litigation Support providers are another resource. We know how to run an efficient discovery process with strict quality control measures. We have teams of experienced attorneys that can be dedicated to only one client. We have the proven protocols and know how to benchmark and track data. We design our services to save money now and in the future. This is all contained in our value proposition for litigation support services; that's not traditionally the case for a law firm.

So while our methods and costs of actually conducting the review of documents differ from a company like H5, and without knowing how O’Melveny will package and bill its clients for this service, the messages that this partnership sends are 1) some law firms are accepting the need for and creating new business models, 2) they recognize exactly how they are a resource to clients in litigation, and 3) They aren’t afraid to tell the world about it. I don’t think it’s a coincidence that our Litigation Support Division has seen increased interest from law firm clients in recent months.

Ultimately, these are all good signs for the profession (and especially clients).
 

Discovery Symposium 1.0 Promises To Share Best Practices

Next week, we will have the pleasure of welcoming 35 senior in-house litigation managers, representing 25 companies, to our home base in Nashville for the inaugural Counsel On Call Discovery Symposium 1.0. It’s very exciting for us, as it provides the opportunity to get several of our clients in a room together and talk about best practices in discovery and litigation support.

We tried to limit the event to about 30 attorneys to foster a healthy environment for exchanging experiences, and we’re pleased that the demand has been so high. It's a great program – discussing all areas of discovery – that is completely led by the attorneys who are in the trenches and dealing with these challenges on a daily (hourly) basis. We’re proud to be by their side, but in this instance we’re merely facilitators and believe that’s going to help generate the best possible dialogue among some of the brightest minds in the in-house profession.

Here are a few of the session titles:

  • “Good Policies for Retention and Holds; Standards of Care in Preservation and Collection”
  • “De-dupe, Near Dupe and Being Duped: Software Decisions Good and Bad”
  • “Working With My Law Firm: The New Dynamics”
  • “Creating Your Own Discovery Team”
  • “Budgeting for E-discovery: Not a Pipe Dream”

We will likely produce a recap that shares some of the best practices discussed during the event, and if you’re an in-house attorney interested in reading it, please send us an e-mail and we will add you to the distribution list. Also, based on the response this year, we are considering opening up the event to non-clients in 2010 (event will be in Atlanta or Boston), so please indicate if you would like to receive information when it becomes available.

And if you like Twitter, we’d recommend following Dennis McKinnie, formerly a general counsel of two publicly traded companies, formerly with PoGo’s IP litigation group, and a past Staff Counsel to the Supreme Court of the United States … he’s been the Executive Director of our Atlanta office the last four years, and he just got his Twitter account up and running and will tweet during the program. Dennis is well-known for his txt/Blackberry skills, so we’re going to put him to the test.

Richard Stout will also post on this blog from the event, so don’t forget to check back May 13-14. Subscribing to the blog (on the right side of this page) is the easiest way to make sure you don’t miss an expanded update.