Popular Posts: Jan. 1 to June 30, 2010

July is the perfect time to reflect on the first half of the year. Things have been so busy here that we haven't had as much time to post as we'd like, but one of our second-half goals is to contribute more to Lawdable.

In the meantime, here are the five most viewed Lawdable posts to January to July 2010, in descending order:

#5: Legal Project Management: Fad or Focus? (Barry Willms, April 7)
More discussion on LPM, which points to some recent successes and the necessity for the project manager to have authority and follow several key guideline. This follows other popular posts on LPM from Richard Stout (January, see #3), Dennis McKinnie (June 2009) and Candice Reed (June 2009), among other LPM musings.

#4: E-Discovery Tools: Evaluate, Collaborate and 'Lawyer the Problem' (Barry Willms, May 21)
One of the summaries of a Discovery Symposium 2.0 panel session with Barry, co-author of Lawdable Richard Stout, and Edward Efkeman from FedEx. A synopsis of the process and decisions in-house departments factor regarding technology tools and how they fit with their respective teams and culture.

#3: The Spotlight Shines on Project Management (Richard Stout, Jan. 21)
This post was part of a multi-blog dialogue about whether PMs should be lawyers or non-lawyers as LPM truly cemented itself in the vernacular of the legal profession at the beginning of the year. Richard even suggested that LPM could provide an alternate path to partnership in law firms in the future. There were many great observations on the 3 Geeks and Hildebrandt blogs and plenty of back-and-forth on Twitter.

#2: Q&A With Attorney Chris Cotton: Haiti Update (Jan. 18)
Chris is a real leader within our E-Discovery Division and a trusted tactician and voice on our teams. He has also spent significant time in Haiti, helping build and launch an orphanage through the Hands and Feet Project before he came to Counsel On Call. He was in regular contact with several people on the ground after the earthquake, spoke to the media, coordinated with Tennessee's congressional delegation, and took a few minutes to speak with us about the situation in Jacmel.

#1: Alternative Fee Arrangements Gain Traction (Candice Reed, Feb. 3)
Talk of AFAs was deafening in the early part of the year and has only slightly quieted down in recent weeks, so it's no suprise a post on the subject drew plenty of interest. We also heard a lot about it at Discovery Symposium 2.0 and have written often about the subject on Lawdable. We're confident it will continue to be of interest for the foreseeable future.

 

 

DS1.0 - Day 2 Begins

8:25am
What a day yesterday was here at the Discovery Symposium in Nashville - my brief posts here can't do it justice. The programming ended with an incredible discussion about the new dynamics of working with law firms ... Brian Edwards (SunTrust), Brian Cadwallader (International Paper) and Jennifer Molinar (Caremark) share some incredible insight and experiences with the group, and not surprisingly this led to a very spiritied discussion. Possibly the most interesting tidbit was regarding the bidding out of every significant matter; Brian Edwards spoke about how beneficial this has been and how his firms understand that SunTrust will walk away if they aren't getting the price/services they're after. The group was intrigued by this and asked several pointed questions.

Some of us (namely me) are probably still a little groggy after enjoying the evening's songwriter's night ... Don Schlitz, who has penned 24(!!!!) No. 1 hits, was kind enough to entertain us. Don is a friend of one of our attorneys, and his wife is also an attorney -- so he had a steady stream of lawyer jokes ready for us, which is always fun.

I'll post more later today...

4:15pm
Everyone is on their way home now, probably somewhat exhausted after another substantive day to close out the Symposium ... we started with a powerhouse panel -- Sue Dyer (HCA), Marty Mazzone (Fidelity Investments), Heather Munday (Georgia Pacific) and Kristen Weathersby (Cox Communications), moderated by Counsel On Call's Candice Reed -- discussing how to create your own discovery team. Over 2.5 hours, these women really broke down how their processes work, who is involved, the challenges they've faced, mistakes they've made and what's most important. Each panelist was asked "If you're just now starting to assemble your discovery team, what would be the first thing you would do?" The unanamous answer was "identify the person in IT who is going to be by my side throughout this process and make things happen." These women were very, very impressive as a group and individually, and as I remarked to someone: "You can see we have some great resources to learn from here at Counsel On Call." We were really pleased that so many people got to hear the information/opinions that we have access to every day.

And that seemed to be a common theme ... our post-event survey responses indicated that there haven't been many (if any) events like this one, that the program was relevant and informative, and truly in the 'best practices' mindset. My biggest takeaway is that in-house attorneys are genuinely excited about the value they can provide to their company in the discovery realm, and many shared some great stories about the reactions they've received when showing the cost savings of the processes they've implemented.

A great event all around ... we'll post some of the best practices that were discussed during the event soon.