Who Are the E-Discovery Attorneys?

In previous entries, I wrote about enjoying the discovery work that I do. Recently I have given more thought to the question of why it is that I enjoy it; after all, so many attorneys view the work as transitional or laborious. For me, the autonomy is great. The subject matter changes from project to project. I have opportunities to meet and work with different attorneys, clients, litigation support staff, and vendors, all of which I consider an added bonus. These things would also be true if I were practicing in a more “traditional” manner as well, however. So my assessment is that it must be something deeper that compels me to choose this career path over any other.


It was only recently that, when introduced by Andy Branham of the Memphis office as somewhat of a “computer nerd who happens to be an attorney,” that I had an epiphany. He was right.


There is a subset within the legal profession comprised of attorneys who consider themselves specialist discovery attorneys. The attorneys I’m referring to consciously chose to work in this rapidly expanding area of the law. But where did they come from? Perhaps some attorneys have inadvertently found this career as a result of being the go-to person for technology-related questions in a firm. Discovery attorneys possess a genuine interest in the work and a desire to use their experiences to contribute in the discovery process. These attorneys appreciate the complexity of e-discovery, the intricacy of the collection, culling and review processes, and ultimately the end product, the production. Here at Counsel On Call, our attorneys also often have the opportunity to handle additional discovery-related work, such as privilege log, research and writing and witness prep, among other responsibilities.


Perhaps these attorneys can visualize the process more easily than their colleagues. Perhaps they consider how technology can provide them alternatives and understand and embrace it, not just the end product that the technology may provide. Discovery attorneys are problem-solvers with a twist, using the technology to their advantage. They may work for large corporations, law firm technology departments, or independent e-discovery organizations that fill the niche role of discovery counsel. They work in conjunction and partner with in-house and outside counsel completing what could be referred to as the three-legged stool model of client representation.
 

E-discovery is still in its infancy and for me, as well as others drawn to this work, it is a grand opportunity, one that allows us to continually improve upon our skill set and enhances our knowledge base. I am thankful to have experienced mentors at Counsel On Call who appreciate this desire and continually assist in the furtherance of my growth as a discovery attorney by providing advice, insight and other resources. They recognize the value in providing growth opportunities that will not only benefit the individual and the team but also provide added value to our clients.


There’s also no question technology helps my colleagues and me do our jobs better and faster, thereby amplifying that value we offer our clients. That’s a win-win scenario as I see it, and I think attorneys who are into learning about new tools are perfect for e-discovery work. I look forward to diving into the practical uses of this technology in subsequent posts.

Shawn DeHaven is a Counsel On Call attorney and team leader and has offered to post his thoughts on the discovery process and working with Counsel On Call on Lawdable. To learn more about Shawn, please see his bio or the profile piece in Counsel On Call’s newsletter from last summer.
 

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