Popular Posts: Jan. 1 to June 30, 2010

July is the perfect time to reflect on the first half of the year. Things have been so busy here that we haven't had as much time to post as we'd like, but one of our second-half goals is to contribute more to Lawdable.

In the meantime, here are the five most viewed Lawdable posts to January to July 2010, in descending order:

#5: Legal Project Management: Fad or Focus? (Barry Willms, April 7)
More discussion on LPM, which points to some recent successes and the necessity for the project manager to have authority and follow several key guideline. This follows other popular posts on LPM from Richard Stout (January, see #3), Dennis McKinnie (June 2009) and Candice Reed (June 2009), among other LPM musings.

#4: E-Discovery Tools: Evaluate, Collaborate and 'Lawyer the Problem' (Barry Willms, May 21)
One of the summaries of a Discovery Symposium 2.0 panel session with Barry, co-author of Lawdable Richard Stout, and Edward Efkeman from FedEx. A synopsis of the process and decisions in-house departments factor regarding technology tools and how they fit with their respective teams and culture.

#3: The Spotlight Shines on Project Management (Richard Stout, Jan. 21)
This post was part of a multi-blog dialogue about whether PMs should be lawyers or non-lawyers as LPM truly cemented itself in the vernacular of the legal profession at the beginning of the year. Richard even suggested that LPM could provide an alternate path to partnership in law firms in the future. There were many great observations on the 3 Geeks and Hildebrandt blogs and plenty of back-and-forth on Twitter.

#2: Q&A With Attorney Chris Cotton: Haiti Update (Jan. 18)
Chris is a real leader within our E-Discovery Division and a trusted tactician and voice on our teams. He has also spent significant time in Haiti, helping build and launch an orphanage through the Hands and Feet Project before he came to Counsel On Call. He was in regular contact with several people on the ground after the earthquake, spoke to the media, coordinated with Tennessee's congressional delegation, and took a few minutes to speak with us about the situation in Jacmel.

#1: Alternative Fee Arrangements Gain Traction (Candice Reed, Feb. 3)
Talk of AFAs was deafening in the early part of the year and has only slightly quieted down in recent weeks, so it's no suprise a post on the subject drew plenty of interest. We also heard a lot about it at Discovery Symposium 2.0 and have written often about the subject on Lawdable. We're confident it will continue to be of interest for the foreseeable future.

 

 

Opportunity Missed?

There’s an article today in the ABA Journal regarding a survey of the 50 largest law firms in the U.S. and their use of outsourced legal services.

The only eye-popping numbers you’ll see in the survey results, however, are that 83% of the law firms surveyed declined to participate. The surveyors cite ethical and proprietary business concerns about law firms admitting the use of contract or outsourced attorneys, but in reality this is the fine line firms feel they must walk concerning their image. To be sure, Big Law has taken its lumps in the press during the last couple of years and they probably don’t see much that can be gained by participating in a survey like this.

But here’s what we’ve been hearing and seeing in meeting after meeting with hundreds of corporate legal departments in recent months: 1) they have demanded that their law firms outsource work like e-discovery, due diligence, contracts, patents and many other labor-intensive matters, or 2) they have partnered with law firms who have proactively brought outsourced solutions to them and ended relationships with law firms that haven’t been so forward-thinking.

It's also worth mentioning that we’ve also met and worked with a large number of top law firms in the last year, and call several of the AmLaw 100 some of our best clients -- and a handful have been with us for nearly a decade.

So while the survey results might not be that surprising, it does seem like an opportunity lost for firms who are constantly trying to gain market share and differentiate for their competition. Orrick, for one, has been very outspoken on their plans to utilize contract attorneys. While its “associate track” model is still in its early stages, it appears a promising – and differentiating – model that speaks not only to the needs of clients, but to the ever-changing needs of the attorney workforce.

At some point in the not-too-distant-future, none of this will be an issue... it will simply be part of the business that large chunks of legal work are outsourced (even though that’s the case already -- but shhhhh).