Legal Project Management: Fad or Focus?

Like alternative fee arrangements, Legal Project Management (LPM) has become somewhat of a new fad – or at least a very popular topic to discuss and write about. While it’s still unclear how much attention the broader legal landscape truly gives this discipline (although some are making a noticeable commitment to it), I’m of the opinion that LPM should be a key focus of the legal profession moving forward.

LPM is not only about getting things done cheaper and on time, it’s about using best practices and process to accomplish desired goals and budget predictability. To accomplish this, the project manager (PM) must have authority, as Paul C. Easton states in a recent blog post. It’s key, and not only with the attorney team, but with the different departments and personnel involved in any project. That level of responsibility requires experience and a track record – the ability to develop and oversee processes, meet benchmarks, stay on or below budget, and develop consistency -- and having done it many times over. Simply pushing the task down to the lowest possible billing rate, a practice Easton frowns upon in his post, is counter-productive in most instances.

While we commonly see its use in discovery-related matters today, LPM should be the focus of any-size project requiring coordination of more than one person and there have been many successful PM-led initiatives in other areas of the law. It doesn’t matter the area of law, really, because budgets, organization, timelines, process, quality standards, and repeatability are universally necessary considerations. Each is part of the LPM role, and each can be improved dramatically with a great PM. A PM who understands a client’s bigger picture is even more valuable and can help bring core disciplines from one department to another, building on previously successful practices (e.g. e-discovery to due diligence or employment work).

However, without authority – or at least a seat at the decision-making table -- the PM’s power to generate results is effectively non-existent. Spinning wheels, waiting for sign-off by the higher-ups on everything, direction that differs from previously successful results, and choices that are subject to constant overturning… this breeds confusion, stagnation, indecision, and ultimately higher costs.

If you go the route of project management, don’t go halfway. Make a commitment and give it the resources (and power) it needs to be successful.
 

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