E-Discovery is Trust and Commitment

There’s a very good post on Clearwell’s e-discovery 2.0 blog about the process of bringing e-discovery in-house, or more importantly some of the questions that need to be asked during that process.

One particular observation in the post stuck out to me: “…every company today, believe it or not, has an e-discovery solution in place.” This is very true. Many companies who must scramble or shift work around internally to address a pressing matter or who automatically send any and all litigation straight to outside counsel might not characterize their approach as a “solution” (more of a default mechanism, maybe), but it is a solution, nonetheless. From that point forward, the steps and questions laid out in the post are certainly good ways to look at the in-house e-discovery process.

The statement also juxtaposes another observation in the post about in-house departments going through the RFP process and seeking an “end-to-end” e-discovery solution. These two statements, in my view, are actually directly related. Many in-house departments are not equipped to handle any significant e-discovery work, so in the past they simply sent that work to their law firm(s) because they could physically handle the review of the documents (and were already handling case strategy). Now that the in-house departments are under incredible pressure to cut costs, they must come up with a different solution, but still don’t have the resources or time to handle it internally. They want a simple, straightforward solution that they can hand off and know it will be handled in a quality, cost-sensitive manner.

I believe this encapsulates one of the most challenging issues we face in the e-discovery realm today, one that our company has spent an inordinate amount of time addressing internally and that

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